NEW VIDEO Prof Curry: Destroy Society; White People Dying Worked

Blog       May 17, 2017 1:36 PMBy:        0 comments

In the latest new audio uncovered by Support Aggies, Texas A&M University Philosophy Professor Tommy Curry lectures to undergraduate students during an introduction to sociology class.

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Professor Curry teaches students, “we have to teach racial minorities that racism in the United States is a permanent feature of American democracy” because they are not currently “prepared to make systematic and political attacks on the foundations of white supremacy in the United States.”

“It requires us to destroy the way that society is formulated now,” Curry taught to the students. “White people dying or the people in power dying has generally worked.”

What do you think? Should professors teach that destroying society and killing white people is the only way to end racism? Is it not reasonable to expose students to other views, such that nonviolent tactics can also produce political and social change? Is Curry’s message what you want freshmen and sophomore A&M students adopting as their view of the world?

Video Transcript:

It requires us to destroy the way that society is formulated now.

I don’t think you’ll like how we can change it. White people dying or the people in power dying has generally worked.

What do I argue? I argue two things. One, we have to give up on the notion that equality in America is possible. Now what do y’all think about that? Am I just angry and pessimistic? What do y’all think about that idea, that racism in America is permanent? So my argument, and this may be a controversial thesis for some, is that we have to teach racial minorities that racism in the United States is a permanent feature of American democracy. My argument is that because of civil rights, multiculturalism, integrationism, we keep teaching people that, ‘oh, everyone can make it, you can work hard, etcetera,’ but we do not pay attention to the institutional and historical remnants of anti-white, or anti-black, racism in the United States. I argue that this leads to a miseducation of minority people, and as such, they are not prepared to make systematic and political attacks on the foundations of white supremacy in the United States.